Frozen Horror | Plane Crashes Just Before Landing in Chicago | American Eagle Flight 4184

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100 comments

  1. Completely unprofessional conversation in the cockpit. Should be ashamed to
    Know their words are recorded

  2. It takes a terrible accident to get the authorities to do the right thing. If many professional pilots refuse to fly this plane in inclement weather, it shouldn't take a lost of lives to correct the problem. Their judgment should have been enough!

  3. That's why my overhead luggage always had a parachute. I planned to tell people I was going for help. And although I was a skydiver, fortunately for me and the people on the plane with me, i never had to use that plan.

  4. WHY DOES THE GUY WHO MAKES THESE VIDEOS ALWAYS CUT AWAY
    FROM AN EXTERIOR SHOT RIGHT BEFORE A PLANE DOES A FULL ROLL?!?
    ALWAYS.

  5. I got to say. I would prefer my pilots to act more MATURE while on the job, and remember they are responsible for every life on board. Than a horny teenager. Save it for when you're on the ground.

  6. In most cases it happens due to confusion and due to improper judgement.. In some cases it's technical problem or bad weather .. If I am not wrong?

  7. So I took a similar fight from Cincinnati to Chicago a year later on this exact type of plane in December. Believe me this accident weighed heavy on my mind! If I recall right another plane like this crashed for the same reason elsewhere at a later date so the airlines decided to use these planes only in the south where there is no threat of icing. In my case it was snowing on my return trip in Chicago, but as soon as we were de-iced we took off and the pilot didn't slow down even for the decent info Cincinnati. I was glad my son and I arrived safe but since then I appreciate that with the advent of the internet you can choose what kind of plane you want to fly in. Believe me I'd never choose one of these!

  8. Slats are known to strongly protect against icing but smaller regional aircraft designs sometimes avoid them to save a little cost. Had the ATR 72 had slats this would have been avoided. Power control would also would have prevented this. Dornier put power controls on to the Do 328 but cheap designs like the ATR avoid it. Fly By Wire also likely would have detected the stall and pitched the nose down.

  9. Truly terrifying for all on board .. haven’t flown for 16 years and I never will again .. whatever way I go will not be like this thank god . RIP innocents x

  10. I can't imagine how watching all of these TFC videos is going to benefit me in any way, as far as finding comfort with future flying…..but man they are entertaining.

  11. Alaska airlines has a flight go inverted for a while as well over the Pacific Ocean and that looked hellish as well. I plan on going skydiving for the first time later this year and I’m sort of skittish about it. Hopefully it’s not too addictive it’s gotta be better than heroin. Cheers Bill

  12. These crashes should include the final words of the pilots. Their screams and begging for mercy just before they hit.

    We’re all here for the truth and that’s how it is.

  13. That is a beautiful plane, Is there a reason for not having a general de-icing system to automatically turn on or just on in the area of possible ice. This is totally avoidable in the first place, No one thought of this before?

  14. This crash sight is about 17 miles from my house in Roselawn,Indiana.Just south of Rt.10 on CR400w……..the crash happened out in the middle of a bean field but there is a memorial up next to the road.Fredia is my lady and I am the guy who knows the nurse who had told me her other nurse friends pet had brought home a hunk of flesh.By that time it was kept guard over from pets and or wild critters from running off with parts.Just one guy witnessed the plane hitting the ground as he was returning from work in the cold rainy evening of Halloween 1994.But many people heard and felt the loud boom when it hit the ground.As far as 2 miles away .The local eatery in Roselawn is where the horror stories circulated about the crash.Many of the volunteers that searched would meet there for coffee.The whole area took a month to clean up about 99% of the plane and flesh.As sad as it sounds….this was mainly poor pilot judgement and the problems of the ATR-72s wing design because of ice build up.Many believe it was 68 people's time to be called home to God.I was there at the memorial several times to leave flowers….or a flag or at least say a prayer.I was not trying to gross people out or give them horrible nightmarish thoughts…..I was just telling exactly what I was told by at least 20 people RIP to all who died that day.

  15. Just to show how sick people were….they were playing Indiana Pick 4 Lotto with the numbers 4184……shortly after….it was banned to play that number.

  16. ~ The NTSB crash report made it clear that both the captain and his female first officer were, not only, under paid, over stressed, and over tired, they BOTH had shown signs of incompetency in their training and flying careers. They both proved it when they became distracted talking about extraneous matters during a blind instrument approach in snowy icing conditions, and both STOPPED observing their flight indications, namely, speed, and that they were picking up ice, until their plane stalled, spun, and crashed into the ground. The captain PULLED his flight yoke UP, when the plane nosed down in to a stall, and caused the spin, which was unrecoverable before they hit the ground.

  17. atr''s are pieces of garbage, made to be as cheap as possible, and i say that as an european myself. i actively avoid flights operated by atr's.
    atleast my airline of choice made the right call to choose q400's and q200's instead of that death trap to fly my island hops.

  18. The Captain sounds like the biggest creep. Get back to your seat, Instead of talking with the ladies. Now look what happened. Asshole

  19. The Captain was just a little kid! 29 years old! 8000 Hours is pretty amazing for someone that young!
    First office was 30. How sad, such young promising futures.

  20. 11:07 the FAA allowed others to certify the aircraft instead of doing it themselves. Boeing 737 Max springs to mind.

  21. I worked for Continental Express at this time. The airline moved out ATR's down to the Houston region and our EMB's went up north. A good idea except the weather in south Texas went arctic and the ATR's were grounded. Our regional airport didn't have a plane in our out for over a week. At least nobody died.

  22. Bà mẹ chúng nó loài súc sinh csvn. Ngot thế kỷ,chúng thề cuồng Marx,cuỏng Hỏ,không tín ngưởng không đạo ( vô thẩn) vô chùa,vô nhà thờ " chết liền " Vậy mà , cả cuộc đời làm thân ăn cướp của dân,giết dân như đao phủ ,của cải tiền bạc đầy kho,lại thấy chúng chấp tay sám hối trước tượng Phật Thích Ca , thật là nham nhở ,xấu hổ,nhục nhã tổ tông! chỉ có bọn cuồng đảng mới hành động dị hợm ,bọn mặt sắt !!,

  23. This is an EXTREMELY difficult thing for me to watch. I was working that day for this airline. It departed from and was scheduled to arrive at the gate I was working. I knew the whole crew, horrible tragic. I will never forget this. I am still to this day employed with this company.

  24. Yeah, I was a passenger on an American Eagle between Atlanta and Panama City Beach FL. That thing was all over the flight path. Up, down, tilt a little too much left and right for my comfort! I couldn't imagine how those pilots managed to keep it in the air. I was terrified and not like me. I thought for sure we were going to crash. I was white knuckling the arms of the seat and I'm a frequent flyer! I was so glad to get off that plane and I vowed to never, ever take another American Eagle flight again. Now, tell me, aren't all of these planes permanently grounded? I thought I heard something like that a while ago. And yes, I never got on another American Eagle.

  25. The safety of airliners is practically 100%..but I always think as the pilot does a hard bank while approaching landing…if for some reason the flaps stick..then Im going to die in a spiralling plane, screaming all the way down.

  26. Was the Captain seriously going to bang one of the stewardesses in the air? I mean, you want to fool around with them, do it ON THE GROUND. As a pilot 100% of your attention must be focused on pre-flight and fight, including weather. Something tells me his job did not have 100% of his attention. I know the airplane is at fault, but would you want a pilot like this?

  27. I can imagine some of the fear these souls went through because just watching this is making my heart feel strange and I feel like I am getting ready to have an asthma attack. This is why I don't fly. If I can't take a train, or I can't go in our small RV, I just stay home. Fear of flying was not an issue for me until the last 12 years, and it's really the fear of flipping over and falling.

  28. Years ago I boarded an ATR flight on a very cold morning. A few of us approaching the boarding stairs noticed that both the tyres seemed somewhat flat with the sidewall reduced to about half the normal dimension. We sat shivering in our cold seats as the ground crew tried forlornly to warm the cabin by blowing hot air from an external heater on the runway via a duct through the front door. After about half an hour the engines had still not been turned on and the captain came instructed over the intercom that we would have to deplane and take a bus back to the terminal. He went on to inform us the reason was that a water tank had been drained and then refilled the night before but that someone had left the drain tap open during the refilling exercise and, as a result, tons of water had accumulated In the lower portion of the plane. Due to the sub zero temperatures this water had frozen solid and hence the squished tyres and futile heating. Ice is not to be underestimated.

  29. Jim I know what you saying in part I agree but it not about him it the incident and the very factual way he do this other channels are headline hunting making entertainment out of disaster that wrong.This channel most professional he do not bring families into it just barebones the emotional side is left to viewer .This only flight channel I watch because of that.

  30. Amazing dispute the large time in type this crew was clueless as to the weak ability of a boot equipped system to deal with this nasty kind of ice! Too bad they casually killed themselves and a load of unsuspecting passengers. SICKENING!!!

  31. I disagree with comments about the pilots joking around with each other and bantering. It was a conversation between just them and seemed to be in good fun. Nobody but themselves would've known what was said if the cockpit recordings weren't needed.

  32. "In March 1995, some families of the victims discovered remains of their loved ones on the accident site, giving rise to a suspicion that cleanup efforts were not thorough. In a statement, the Newton County coroner – referring to other comments made – said he was not surprised there were remains left, given how serious the accident was."

    David Allison, PWI Environmental president, said his firm was responsible only for the cleanup of the debris that remained from the plane and soil contaminated by fuel and oil.
    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1995-03-02-9503020015-story.html

  33. It states that the captain ( 29) was commended for promoting a relaxed atmosphere on flights .I find that hilarious in an outraged way . His idea of "relaxed atmosphere " apparently was sitting with the passengers for alittle while, and groping females

  34. So, flying at 9,000 or even 8,000 feet in a storm or clouds, simply can be deadly as is. Nice, real nice to know, certainly when combined with the fact that planes indeed might (by necessity) be forced to stay up there, circling around for dozens of minutes or an hour, and more so the more dangerous such weather conditions are to the plane. A real contradiction – if it weren't potentially deadly you'd think nothing of it! (Of the fact that we also waste loads of fuel AND put our climate under pressure no-one wants to think already.)

  35. Flightchannel you’re so addictive, I love this channel. Good job, recreate flight Et 302 March 2019, that Capt. flew us from Ethiopia to Nairobi in 2018, broke my heart when he crashed. RIP Capt. Yared and all beautiful souls of flight ET 302, missing you already

  36. The Captain was a pure Ahole with his condescending remarks about the female Flight Controller and getting laid at the back of the Plane. Completely Unprofessional and a danger to Passengers.

  37. If the Plane had landed safely in Chicago both the Captain and first officer would have been fired for their dangerous behavior

  38. Sorry to say, but for me it doesn’t matter how many flight hours a pilot or co-pilot has. Maturity is what I would hire for and you can’t get that without age. They were too young, in my book, and by the way they talked and addressed each other, they sounded more like teenagers at a get-together than at a high-risk job that calls for professionalism. If I did the hiring, no one under the age of 40 would be considered. I am 64, but I remember going through life in my mid 20s and, believe me, I didn’t feel mature enough or had enough life’s experience in many situations to avoid being stupid. Not being careless, like doing drugs or shoplifting. Never did those, not even marijuana—not once. Stuff is nasty just by the smell! Anyways, I just knew I didn’t have enough experience that required maturity and learning from mistakes. Still, RIP for all involved.

  39. Tragic. The aircraft was unsafe and the pilots seemed to be on the younger side. Thankfully precautions have been taken regarding icy conditions. 🙏🏻

  40. As a note: De-ice boots don't "melt" ice. What occurs is that some ice is allowed to form. ar the propoer time, given the thickness of the leading edge ice, the boots "inflate" (in reality a vacuum is released) and.that expansion essentially causes ice to break off in chunks. Not an ideal system but it typically works on "rime ice."

  41. 9:17 The deicing boots are not designed to „melt“ ice, they are designed to break it away. Deicing boots are rubber surfaces which can be partially inflated to get rid of the ice.
    Contrary to heated wing leading edges. They melt ice away.

  42. … I will never fly again!!! This is so sad. I flew one time to my grandma's funeral from Rhode island to Tennessee and I said never again. They couldn't even get me to stand up. I crawled to the bathroom .. only good part was when I received free drinks to calm me down..lol. After I walked to get off the plane, the pilot handed me a pair of plastic wings that said Delta on them and told me I earned my wings.. Never again!

  43. Flight 4184 Memorial by Immortal Dreams
    It was a cold and rainy Halloween night; October 31, 1994. A night that many would soon never forget. The winds were blowing at 30mph when American Eagle Flight 4184 began circling 9,000 feet above Northwest Indiana; enroute to Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, having just left Indianapolis. Both pilots had twice informed air control of the situation. In a matter of a few short minutes Flight 4184 came crashing to the ground at 450mph. The impact was so great that no more than one pound of remains could be found for any victim, the impact also left an 8 foot crater in a farm field in Roselawn, Indiana. A total of 68 people lost their lives in this crash. 4 crew members and 64 passengers. Each and every year the families and loved ones gather at the site of the crash for a simple ceremony remembering the lives that once were……

    This year marked the 17 year anniversary of that tragic Halloween night, these images are from the memorial site which the local farmer and town of Roselawn have left to pay tribute to the victims. Never will I share pictures of the families at this site out of respect. This is to simply remember those that lost their lives on that cold, rainy Halloween night.

    The list of crew and passengers can be found below, I thought it only right to include it. There is one exception with one name being omitted by the request of the family.

    Below is a complete list of crew and passengers:

    CREW
    AGUIAR, Orlando, 29, Round Lake, Ill. Pilot. He had logged 4,638 flight-hours since 1991, when American Eagle started computerizing its records. He joined the airline seven years ago.
    GAGLIANO, Jeffrey, 30, Eagle, Wis. Co-pilot. He had logged 3,862 hours since 1991 and had worked for the airline for five years.
    HOLBERG, Amanda, 23, Houston. Flight attendant. Joined the airline on Oct. 6.
    MODAFF, Sandi, 27, Naperville, Ill. Flight attendant. Joined American Eagle in 1988.

    PASSENGERS
    ANGLEMYER, Bruce, 49, Rocky Mount, N.C.
    BAILENSON, Mark, 32, Carpentersville, Ill.
    BAKER, Nancy, 48, San Jose, Calif.
    BEGENY, Joseph, 52, Grayslake, Ill.
    BONNEAU, Peter, 37, LaChenale, Canada.
    BRAMLEY, Timothy, 48, Springfield, Va.
    BURRELL, Jeff, 22, Salisbury, Mass.
    CALDERON, Jose V., Chicago.
    CALDERON, Jose W., Chicago.
    CUNNINGHAM, Richard, 51, Walton, Ind.
    DeMARCO, Gino, 35, Mount Prospect, Ill.
    DENNY, Rich, 38, San Jose, Calif.
    DROY, John, 61, Rockford, Ill.
    DWYER, Cheryl, 41, Arlington Heights, Ill.
    ERNST, Kenneth Raymond.
    FERRYMAN, Valerie, 44, Indianapolis.
    FULLE, G. Kathleen, 47, Des Plaines, Ill.
    GANONG, Jay, 52, Orange County, Calif.
    GARBUTT, Ian W., 33, Hartlepool, England.
    GRIFFO, Richard, 28, Elizabeth, N.J.
    GRIMBERG, Adrian, 24, Colombia.
    GRIMBERG, Gilda, 43, Colombia.
    GRIMBERG, Sammy, 45, Colombia.
    GUBA, Elizabeth A., 37, Indianapolis.
    HENRY, Mrs. Pat, Glenview, Ill.
    HENRY, Pat, Glenview, Ill.
    JOHNSON, Peter, 48, Piedmont, Calif.
    KO, Wan Suk, Seoul, Korea.
    LANDES, Dave, Indianapolis.
    LAROCHE, Brigitte, Granby County, Canada.
    LEECH, The Rev. Ken, Preston, England.
    MacDONALD, John J., 32, Carmel, Ind.
    MASILO, Patricia, 42, Maseru, Lesotho.
    McDAVID, Eileen, Terre Haute, Ind.
    McGEE, Mrs. Jason, Bamberg, Germany.
    McKAY, Elizabeth, 63, Glasgow, Scotland.
    McMILLIN, Rob, Rockford, Ill.
    MICHEL, Jerry, 48, Shelbyville, Ind.
    MOORE, Anthony, 26, Seattle.
    MORRIS, Lewise, 75, Lakeport, Fla.
    NOVICHUK, Bill, 47.
    PARMAR, J. S., Sutton Coldfield, England.
    RAMM, Alan, Preston, England.
    READING, William, 34, Bloomington, Ind.
    ROBITAILLE, Serge, Granby County, Canada.
    SAYLES, Javier, 14.
    SHELLBERG, David, 25, Norman, Okla.
    SHERIDAN, Frank.
    SITHOLE, Elkin, 63, Chicago.
    SJOEBERG, Eva, 77, Ramvik Harmosand, Sweden.
    SJOEBERG, Svenlennart, 74, Ramvik Harmosand, Sweden.
    SMITH-FIELD, Allison.
    SNYDER, David A., 58, Kokomo, Ind.
    SPENCER, Ken, 53.
    STACKHOUSE, Bernice, 58, Tucson, Ariz.
    STACKHOUSE, Dr. H. L., 61, Tucson, Ariz.
    STANSBERRY, Brad, 27, Anderson, Ind.
    STEIN, Maurice B., 58, Hartsdale, N.Y.
    THOMAS, Jerry, Indianapolis.
    THOMPSON, Dana, 27, Chicago.
    TRIBBLE, Barbara, 50, Dallas.
    TWEEDIE, Betty, 60, Renfrew, Scotland.
    WRIGHT, Thomas H., 47, Indianapolis.

  44. If it’s a flight in 2017 your good

    If it’s a flight in 2019 idk

    If it’s American Eagle Flight 4184 oh you ded

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