The Gateway Project – Saving New York from “Transportation Armageddon”

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Hey! New York New Jersey, we need to talk. Right now there are two train tunnels connecting New Jersey to New York City
carrying 95,000 people back and forth everyday. That’s 4,000 people an hour. Work commuter, families, folks celebrating SantaCon. Here’s the problem: These rail tunnels are over a hundred
years old. Think about that. They were built before
World War Two. Heck, they were built before World War One! When they were
built, New Mexico and Arizona weren’t even states yet. That’s how old these tunnels are. Here’s
where it gets bad: Besides already being ancient, these tunnels were badly damaged by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Amtrak has even announced that the
tunnels will have to be closed for extensive repairs. One at a time, for over
a year each. If that happens, we’re going to see a reduction and train capacity by
seventy-five percent, so instead of carrying 95,000 people back and forth
everyday, the trains will only be able to carry 23,000 people everyday. And those
other 72,000 travelers? They’re going to have to take cars. Imagine what that’s
gonna look like. According to reports, traffic will extend
an additional 25 miles from the Lincoln Tunnel into New Jersey. On the Manhattan side, where there are currently nine intersections facing gridlock during
rush hour, the additional traffic will expand the gridlock to 44 intersections. We’re talking “Transportation Armageddon”, a total “train-pocalypse”, or, for the
vikings “commute-narök”. So what do we do? The good news is, the gateway project is
a plan for a high-speed rail corridor between New Jersey and New York that
would double computer capacity from what it is today. It gets better: During construction,
gateway would generate 100,000 jobs and another 100,000 jobs after it’s
completed. It would add nine billion dollars in business activity. It would be
great for the environment too! Once the Gateway tunnel is built, road traffic
across the Hudson would decrease by ten percent, and eliminate a yearly emissions
volume of 181,898 tons of CO2. Basically it’s a great idea that benefits
everybody, and Amtrak has already raised more than 85 million dollars to get
going. We could start work on this by the end
of 2017, we just need permits and that’s where it gets bad again. The last time we tried to build new
tunnels back in 2003, permitting and red-tape delayed the project for six
years. It was eventually dropped after six hundred million dollars had already
been spent. If the same thing happens with gateway,
it will cost taxpayers more than 13 billion dollars for the delays alone. That’s like throwing away four thousand
dollars every minute for the next six years How does that happen? Well, no one is
actually in charge. There are about two dozen agencies involved in the project. Holding meetings, conducting reviews conducting studies, conducting surveys,
giving permits, denying permits, conducting more reviews, more meetings,
more surveys, permits, meetings, studies, reviews, permit, surveys, meetings, permits,
permits, permits, and no one is overseeing the process to make sure it gets done. No one can weigh all of the findings of
all of the reviews and all the surveys and just say “ok let’s do this.” Except
maybe the President. If the President of the United States issued an executive
order that cut through the red tape then yes maybe something would get done. But that’s insane! If someone leaves a dish in the break
room at work, you don’t call the CEO to ask who should clean it. Someone just does it, Darrell. And that’s
where you come in We’re in a crisis, and we need to fix it
now. And the only way to fix anything is to make yourself heard. Share this video with your friends
follow #gatewayproject to keep track of the process, tweet at the people
in charge to hold them accountable. #takecharge. If this makes sense
and you want to know more read our full report at take charge.org and visit
common good.org for more information

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